Impacting Texas Communities

By |2018-11-02T08:38:59+00:00January 7th, 2015|Tags: , , , , , |

From community involvement to networking opportunities, we dedicated time to impact Texas communities and industries in 2014 and plan to do even more in 2015. Below is one of our favorite experiences.

From community involvement to networking opportunities, we dedicated time to impact Texas communities and industries in 2014 and plan to do even more in 2015. Below is one of our favorite experiences.

Putting on the Green

This past year in October, the RS&H Tyler, Texas, office sponsored and participated in the Greater East Texas Acquisitions, Divestitures, and Mergers (GET ADAM) Annual Golf Tournament. The organization brings together professionals from the oil and gas industries. As our first year participating in the tournament, and our first time playing golf (yes that’s right!) we had a fun, if not hair-raising time!

After much discussion and distress, we decided one of our environmental scientists, Kate Lindekugel, should play in the 18-hole tournament since she had taken lessons previously and is considered the class clown of the office. The idea was: if she was truly terrible, then she would be the easiest to crack a joke and take it in stride. One way or another, the afternoon was entertaining!

“I had a great time with, in my humble opinion, the best team on the course!” Kate said. “The game was a scramble with each hole only played to par, so every one of all skill levels had a load of fun. The lunch before provided lots of opportunities for bragging and teasing, but by the end, we were all friends and talking about how we were going to win it next year!”

At the end of the tournament, Kate’s team did better than expected for being shackled with a novice player and they finished comfortably in the middle of the pack. To top it off, she ended up winning a women’s driver in the raffle afterwards. Looks like fate is telling her that golf is her game!

Our other environmental scientists, Neil Boitnott and Elizabeth High, manned a booth at the 14th hole, and served as entertainment for the golfers. They dazzled players with harrowing tales of environmental compliance and lurid stories of permitting follies. But more importantly, they were the only location on the back nine serving water, beer, and snacks. On such an unseasonably hot day, they made many friends and were happy they could meet and help the golfers.

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About the author

Kate Lindekugel
Kate Lindekugel
As an environmental scientist, Kate has more than 13 years of experience including ecological surveys and field studies, functional assessments, preparing environmental reports and permits, data management, stream channel and wetland restoration, peer reviewed research, and coordinating with local, state, and federal regulatory agencies, as well as public and private stakeholders.

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